CALAVERAS Y KAHLO - ARTE AMERICAS FRESNO


CALAVERAS Y KAHLO EXHIBITION
ON VIEW THROUGH NOVEMBER 15, 2015




The traditional celebration of El Día de los Muertos on November 2 is based on the indigenous belief that once a year the departed could return to earth to visit.  Although they can not be seen, they will take comfort in their family’s remembrance of them. Altares constructed in the homes and gravesites, decorated with the gold flor de muerto (flower of death), candles, the smell of copal, and favorite foods would show them that they are remembered and loved.  The spirits take the essence of the food, enjoy the celebration, and leave before dawn.  There are sad stories, but they are of the spirits who returned and found nothing.This exhibition combines the visual, spiritual, and artistic elements of the ancient tradition, interwoven with the spirit of the beloved Mexican artist whose own work reflected themes of death and the afterlife.Born Magdalena Carmen Frieda Kahlo y Calderón on July 6, 1907, the artist lived only until the age of 47.  In her brief lifetime she created 143 paintings, 55 of which are self-portraits.  Late in life, according to one source, she dressed cardboard skeletons in her own clothes and ordered a sugar skull emblazoned with her name on its forehead.

"I tease and laugh at death," Kahlo liked to say, "so that it won't get the better of me."



RECEPTIONS:

Día de los Muertos: Tradiciónes en Oaxaca
A Conversation With Dr. Rosie Arenas
Sunday November 15  
2p-4p in the Community Gallery
FREE